Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass



Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass Was Born A Slave In 1817, But He Never Stopped Dreaming Of His Freedom How Did He Use Education To Get His Freedom

Frederick Douglass n e Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born a slave in the state of Maryland in 1818 After his escape from slavery, Douglass became a renowned abolitionist, editor and feminist Having escaped from slavery at age 20, he took the name Frederick Douglass for himself and became an advocate of abolition Douglass traveled widely, and often perilously, to lecture against sla Frederick Douglass n e Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born a slave in the state of Maryland in 1818 After his escape from slavery, Douglass became a renowned abolitionist, editor and feminist Having escaped from slavery at age 20, he took the name Frederick Douglass for himself and became an advocate of abolition Douglass traveled widely, and often perilously, to lecture against slavery His first of three autobiographies, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass An American Slave, was published in 1845 In 1847 he moved to Rochester, New York, and started working with fellow abolitionist Martin R Delany to publish a weekly anti slavery newspaper, North Star Douglass was the only man to speak in favor of Elizabeth Cady Stanton s controversial plank of woman suffrage at the first women s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848 As a signer of the Declaration of Sentiments, Douglass also promoted woman suffrage in his North Star Douglass and Stanton remained lifelong friends In 1870 Douglass launched The New National Era out of Washington, D.C He was nominated for vice president by the Equal Rights Party to run with Victoria Woodhull as presidential candidate in 1872 He became U.S marshal of the District of Columbia in 1877, and was later appointed minister resident and consul general to Haiti His District of Columbia home is a national historic site D 1895.More

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  • Paperback
  • 158 pages
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Frederick Douglass
  • English
  • 12 August 2019
  • 1580495761

10 thoughts on “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

  1. Stephen says:

    Thank you Mr Douglass this was a life changer for me You are a true American hero and the fact that there are notmonuments, government buildings, holidays or other commemorations of your life seems to me an oversight of epic proportions How often is it that you can honestly say that you ll never be the same after reading a book Well, this life story of a singular individual has changed me.irrevocably I will never be able to sufficiently express my gratitude to Mr Douglass for that Thank you Mr Douglass this was a life changer for me You are a true American hero and the fact that there are notmonuments, government buildings, holidays or other commemorations of your life seems to me an oversight of epic proportions How often is it that you can honestly say that you ll never be the same after reading a book Well, this life story of a singular individual has changed me.irrevocably I will never be able to sufficiently express my gratitude to Mr Douglass for that extraordinary gift of insight I m just not sure how to properly express how deeply this story im...

  2. Kaeleigh Forsyth says:

    I love the review on here that says, This book was kind of hard to get into because of the high level words used in this book In the year 2012 a grown adult product of the USA s educational system finds the vocabulary of a self t...

  3. Bookdragon Sean says:

    Once you learn to read you will forever be free This is powerful, so, so powerful This is a remarkable achievement considering it is written in such a straight forward manner by a man who taught himself to read There is no embellishment or dramatic imagery here it is simple, straightforward, harrowing, fact It...

  4. Petra X says:

    Time for a reread What I likeabout Douglass than anything else at all is his clear thinking on subject peoples He saw that the discrimination against blacks and women was from an identical stance That white men were imposing a structure of equality and entitlement that placed them at the top, and everyone else far beneath them Indeed America s much lauded equality didn t apply to Blacks as they property not people It hasn t changed much in very many countries, if not all, but you can Time for a reread What I likeabout Douglass than anything else at all is his clear thinking on subject peoples He saw that the discrimination against blacks and women was from an identical stance That white men were imposing a structure of equality and entitlement that placed them at the top, and everyone else far beneath them Indeed America s much lauded equality didn t apply to Blacks as they property not people It hasn t changed much in very many countries, if not all, but you can change the descriptive white to whichever group of men have ensured they are sitting at the top of the economic and social freedom tree But it is always men.In the UK, where Douglass was on a speaking tour with William Wilberforce, he emphasised that the emancipation of slavery had also to include that of women whose condition was also as owned prope...

  5. Richard says:

    This book is not an important historical document to be placed in a glass case and venerated during Black History Month It should be read by all, regardless of race or creed, as a warning against prejudice and oppression.Douglass description of the cruel conditions of slavery is mind searing His analysis of the system which fostered and condoned it shows amazing depth He shows that slavery made wretched the lives of the victims but that it also warped the perpetrators, and created a regime i This book is not an important historical document to be placed in a glass case and venerated during Black History Month It should be read by all, regardless of race or creed, as a warning against prejudice and oppression.Douglass description of the cruel conditions of slavery is mind searing His analysis of the system which fostered and condoned it shows amazing depth He shows that slavery made w...

  6. Cheryl says:

    My copybook was the board fence, brick wall, and pavement my pen and ink was a lump of chalk With these, I learned mainly how to write As with Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, I feel as though I should start by reiterating these simple truths about the narrative Yes, Douglass did write this book himself No, he was not against Christianity, only a staunch opponent of hypocritical Christians No, he did not promote hatred of man his hate was of slavery The hearth is desolate The My copybook was the board fence, brick wall, and pavement my pen and ink was a lump of chalk With these, I learned mainly how to write As with Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, I feel as though I should start by reiterating these simple truths about the narrative Yes, Douglass did write this book himself No, he was not against Christianity, only a staunch opponent of hypocritical Christians No, he did not promote hatred of man his hate was of slavery The hearth is desolate The children, the unconscious children, who ...

  7. Jason Koivu says:

    Powerful, eloquent and utterly moving, especially considering it was written by a man who taught himself how to read and write while a slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass regrettably does not go into detail regarding the particulars of Douglass escape to freedom Having written his memoirs while slavery was still ongoing, he was afraid to reveal his methods for fear of endangering the lives of those ...

  8. James says:

    Book ReviewI first read the biographical introduction about Frederick Douglass and learned many new things I knew he wrote a few autobiographies, but I never knew that he spanned them over 40 years of writing and that he lived for close to 80 years I then read both the preface by Garrison and the letter to Douglas They were excellent introductions to the narrative by Frederick Douglass They set the mood and get you ready to experience a whole new set of emotions when you read Douglass LBook ReviewI first read the biographical introduction about Frederick Douglass and learned many new things I knew he wrote a few autobiographies, but I never knew that he spanned them over 40 years of writing and that he lived for close to 80 years I then read both the preface by Garrison and the letter to Douglas They were excellent introductions to the narrative by Frederick Douglass They set the mood and get you ready to experience a whole new set of emotions when you read Douglass Life of an American Slave, etc It really prepares you for the glory in the words and language You realize how much Douglass meant to the enslaved people It also gives you an overwhelming sense of sullen melancholy You almost can t believe that something like this happened to Douglass It is ver...

  9. Raya راية says:

  10. Diane says:

    What a powerful piece of writing this is Slavery is such an ugly part of American history, and this narrative tells all of the ordeals that Frederick Douglass had to overcome, including whippings, beatings, hunger, tyrannical masters, backbreaking labor, and horrible living conditions Douglass was born in Maryland in 1818, but even that year is a guess because slaves were generally not allowed to know their birthdate He knew little of his mother because the master sent her away, and then she What a powerful piece of writing this is Slavery is such an ugly part of American history, and this narrative tells all of the ordeals that Frederick Douglass had to overcome, including whipp...

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