All Over But the Shoutin



All Over But the Shoutin The Story Of A Violent, War Haunted, Alcoholic Father And A Strong Willed, Loving Mother Who Struggled To Protect Her Three Sons From The Effects Of Poverty And Ignorance That Had Tainted Her Own LifeThe Extraordinary Gifts For Evocation And Insight And The Stunning Talent For Storytelling That Earned Rick Bragg A Pulitzer Prize For Feature Writing In Are Here Brought To Bear On The Wrenching Story Of His Own Family S Life It Is The Story Of A Violent, War Haunted, Alcoholic Father And A Strong Willed, Loving Mother Who Struggled To Protect Her Three Sons From The Effects Of Poverty And Ignorance That Had Tainted Her Own Life It Is The Story Of The Life Bragg Was Able To Carve Out For Himself On The Strength Of His Mother S Encouragement And Belief

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the All Over But the Shoutin book, this is one of the most wanted Rick Bragg author readers around the world.

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  • Paperback
  • 329 pages
  • All Over But the Shoutin
  • Rick Bragg
  • English
  • 04 February 2018
  • 0679774025

10 thoughts on “All Over But the Shoutin

  1. Cheri says:

    Rick Bragg draws the poor rural Southern upbringing so truthfully from his own past, and while it may be foreign from my own, it is a background I am very familiar with Southern roots run deep, they ran deep in my grandparents, and in my father s distant memories, that grew less a part of him as he flew all those miles trying to put it behind him Poverty isn t about location It isn t only found in Bragg s hometown Alcoholics are everywhere Abusive husbands and fathers are rarely news I can Rick Bragg draws the poor rural Southern upbringing so truthfully from his own past, and while it may be foreign from my own, it is a background I am very familiar with Southern roots run deep, they ran deep in my grandparents, and in my father s distant memories, that grew less a part of him as he flew all those miles trying to put it behind him Poverty isn t about location It isn t only found in Bragg s hometown Alcoholics are everywhere Abusive husbands and fathers are rarely news I can t begin to imagine who I d be with those same memories You only have to read about the difference in how it affected him vs his brothers to know no one has the same story to tell even when they ve grown up in the same house Much like that old telephone game played by so many so many years ago, the story changes as each person relays what they heard But I don t need to have had his experiences growing up I ve heard his story, have heard my father s stories, my grandparents stories I know enough to know to be grateful As you might expect, being the rural South, religion figures in this memoir, but it s gently weaved through his stories covered as a journalist, his personal stories of funerals attended, crosses born It s the people, the experiences, the feelings and emotions, his stories of home his family overflow with nostalgic imagery Sometimes painful to read, softened somewhat through the passage of time.It s his profound love of his family, his mother, his brothers, aunts, uncles and cousins that is ever constant this memoir speaks to me, the sense of family, the religion of place, the sense of belonging, this is what connects me to Bragg, the recognition of the holiness of family, be they biological or man made

  2. Diane Barnes says:

    I decided to re read this one, as it was the July pick for the group On the Southern Literary Trail I first read it when it was just published and since have read the other two family memoirs he s written, Ava s Man , the story of his grandfather and his mother s family, and The Prince of Frogtown the story of his alcoholic father Rick Bragg is a poet who just happens to put everything down in prose.He is a proud Southerner who has found a way to get past his young shame at being poor and u I decided to re read this one, as it was the July pick for the group On the Southern Literary Trail I first read it when it was just published and since have read the other two family memoirs he s written, Ava s Man , the story of his grandfather and his mother s family, and The Prince of Frogtown the story of his alcoholic father Rick Bragg is a poet who just happens to put everything down in prose.He is a proud Southerner who has found a way to get past his young shame at being poor and uneducated, and has found the noble and courageous qualities in his family and his people as he calls his community of Piedmont, Alabama, where he was raised His father was a drunk who abandoned the family when he was six, and his mother raised three small sons on welfare and family charity, along with picking cotton, doing rich people s laundry, and cleaning their houses To say he has honored his mother in this book would be an understatement he has darn near exalted her to Sainthood but it is a status that seems to be deserved.This is not just the story of his childhood, but his journey as a newspaper reporter with 6 months of college who learned his craft on the fly His bravado and talent earned him a job at the New York Times and a Pulitzer Prize along the way, but his proudest achievement in life was being able to buy his mother a house and get her out of the 2 room cabin she had lived in for 30 years.Rick Bragg s writing is a thing of beauty and comes from the heart If you ve never read him, do yourself a favor and put this book on your list

  3. Ethan says:

    This book was difficult to read Not because of the descriptions of poverty, but because of the author Bragg s bloated, melodramatic prose and the massive chip on his shoulder made reading this book a chore What is the unholy attraction to one line paragraphs The godawful overwritten and pompous humble beginnings, perhaps, but certainly not humble endings narrative made me nauseous The writing reminded me of Tuesdays With Morrie, another book that could have been decent if not for the melo This book was difficult to read Not because of the descriptions of poverty, but because of the author Bragg s bloated, melodramatic prose and the massive chip on his shoulder made reading this book a chore What is the unholy attraction to one line paragraphs The godawful overwritten and pompous humble beginnings, perhaps, but certainly not humble endings narrative made me nauseous The writing reminded me of Tuesdays With Morrie, another book that could have been decent if not for the melodrama As I read passage after passage about his travels, it occurred to me that Bragg s brand of journalism is littlethan ambulance chasing he zips in, catalogs the hurts for his audience composed of the very same people he insults for most of the book and then zips out to collect his paycheck and journalistic accoladdes Perhaps if he had spent less time talking about the great things he s done and quoting himself, ugh it might have been a better book Perhaps if he d actually toned down his obvious dislike of all things non poor southern I don t know This thing was fingernails on a blackboard for me.There are moments in this book that are nice, and passages that are beautiful, but they are smothered by the rest of the garbage It s obvious from the ratings that a lot of folks really love this book, but I am wholly unimpressed These stories have been told much, much better by others

  4. Caley Rogers says:

    This book is FILLED with wonderful imagery and is the memior of New York Times write Rick Bragg Here s a quotation This is not an important book Anyone could tell it, anyone who had a momma who went eighteen years without a new dress so that her sons could have school clothes, who picked cotton in other people s fields and ironed other people s clothes and cleaned the mess in other people s houses, so that her children didn t have to live on welfare alone, so that one of them could climb u This book is FILLED with wonderful imagery and is the memior of New York Times write Rick Bragg Here s a quotation This is not an important book Anyone could tell it, anyone who had a momma who went eighteen years without a new dress so that her sons could have school clothes, who picked cotton in other people s fields and ironed other people s clothes and cleaned the mess in other people s houses, so that her children didn t have to live on welfare alone, so that one of them could climb up her backbone and escape the poverty and hopelessness that ringed them, free and clean

  5. Alison says:

    I am a Yankee although I now live in the South , and this book darn near killed me It made me cry just about every time I picked it up I still get weepy just thinking about how his momma came to New York, or when she stood up to his daddy after pouring out his moonshine and said, just don t hurt my teeth Some may find Bragg s writing unbearably over the top in its aw shucks Southernness, but if simple lines like that don t punch you in the gut, you could possibly be made of stone.

  6. Rachel Elizabeth says:

    Literature of the American South has always been a favorite of mine Flannery O Connor, Robert Penn Warren, Tennessee Williams not only is their work spiritually and emotionally complex, it s heady with a feeling of place In the first quarter of this book, Rick Bragg replicates that feeling almost better than the classics While all of the authors mentioned above capture the South in a way that feels real, none of them have made me feel so truthfully how alien the rural, poor Southern upbrin Literature of the American South has always been a favorite of mine Flannery O Connor, Robert Penn Warren, Tennessee Williams not only is their work spiritually and emotionally complex, it s heady with a feeling of place In the first quarter of this book, Rick Bragg replicates that feeling almost better than the classics While all of the authors mentioned above capture the South in a way that feels real, none of them have made me feel so truthfully how alien the rural, poor Southern upbringing is from my own middle class East Coast background I had a distinct sense of you know, for as much as these books make me dream of the South, I will never fit in there It s an excellent reminder of how deep everyone s roots run.Bragg s memoir is also excellent as concerns his momma, whom he writes about with such love and tenderness that it s hard not to see her from his adoring perspective The middle through almost the end of the book, as Bragg discusses his adulthood and journalism career, were just OK for me Many of the stories he told, from Florida to Haiti to New York City and back home, were fascinating, but I didn t feel he earned some of the connections he made between his own life and the lives of the criminals and victims he covered for the news Claiming to understand Susan Smith s urge to make herself appealing to a rich man to escape her poor millworker family background is emotionally generous all right, given that she killed her children to do it I don t think it was truly factors of class that led her to that decision I don t think Bragg is naive enough to think that either Upon finishing most books, my urge isoften to rate them a star higher than they probably deserve My urge with this one was the opposite I initially wanted to say I just liked it But the deep love for family that bookends this memoir really resonates with me In fact, it affected me so much that in the middle of reading it, I went to visit my 100 year old great grandmother in the nursing home for the first time in a couple of months Her health has declined so much in the past year She walked for herself and cooked for herself well into age 99, but then she got sick around Christmas and now she can barely understand words, push herself out of the chair, or stay awake during the day There s almost none of her left and it s very, very difficult to see But because of this book, I felt how important it was to try I did what I feared I would and cried when she had trouble understanding a simple sentence repeated over and over, but she was happy for the visit

  7. Larry Bassett says:

    Rick Bragg would get five stars for telling a good story The fact of the matter is he got the Pulitzer Prize for telling good stories I even liked most of his stories, even the ones about alligators But I actually give him three stars because I did often wish that he wouldn t be such a good ole boy and would just get to the point The sad thing is that his mother had a really hard life and there wasn t really very much he did to make it better Sure, he saved his money and bought her a house Rick Bragg would get five stars for telling a good story The fact of the matter is he got the Pulitzer Prize for telling good stories I even liked most of his stories, even the ones about alligators But I actually give him three stars because I did often wish that he wouldn t be such a good ole boy and would just get to the point The sad thing is that his mother had a really hard life and there wasn t really very much he did to make it better Sure, he saved his money and bought her a house Of her, he says, Of course, she was still there, surrounded by those old sadnesses Nothing seemed to change on her side, except the calendar I didn t get into this business to change the world I just wanted to tell stories But now and then, you can make people care, make people notice that something ain t quite right, and nudge them gently, with the words, to get off their ass and fix it Rick Bragg I am a latecomer to the writing of Rick Bragg who won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 1996 for the NY Times All Over But the Shoutinis the first book in the Rick Bragg trilogy published in 1997 that has gotten very good reviews from members of the GR group On the Southern Literary Trail Bragg is a journalist, a fact that attracted me to his work and to look forward to reading what he writes.At least part of a memoir is memories I know I had a third brother, an infant who died because we were left alone and with no money for her to see a doctor, that he did not live long enough to have a name I know his gravestone just reads Baby Bragg and my momma never mentioned him to us, for thirty years, but carried his memory around deep inside her, like a piece of broken glass Rick Bragg describes a world that I can hardly imagine This was, remember, a world of pulpwooders and millworkers and farmers, of men who ripped all the skin off their knuckles working on junk cars and ignored the blood that ran down their arms In that world, strength and toughness were everything, sometimes the only things It was common, acceptable, not to be able to read, but a man who wouldn t fight, couldn t fight, was a pathetic thing To be afraid was shameful I am not saying I agree with it It s just the way it was When I started at the beginning, the book was hard to read The words were skillfully written and sometimes beautiful but the meaning made it rough going, slow moving Hard to read about such a hard life But somehow Bragg writes about a hard life like it wasthan a mite interesting He says that even when you are poor, the one great meal of the day was breakfast, because breakfast is cheap To this day I dream not of beautiful women and wealth and power as often as I dream of sausage gravy over biscuits with a sliced tomato on the side, and a small lake of real grits not that bland, pale, watery restaurant stuff I would not serve on death row, but grits cooked with butter and plenty of salt and black pepper Just so you know that Bragg did not just write about breakfast in poverty, there was plenty of this That night, for no reason at all beyond the fact that he was drunk, he went mean again Momma, as always, tried to fend him off even as she herded us out of harm s way, back into the bedroom We hid not in the bed but under it, and whispered to each other of how you reckon you can kill a grown man Daddy would return from God know where every now and then, but only to terrorize us, to drink and rage and, finally, sleep like he was dead He would strike out at whoever was near, but again it always seemed that she was between him and us, absorbing his cruelty, accepting it Then he would leave, without giving her a dime, without asking if we had food, without giving a damn.How could anyone enjoy reading a book written with these details, even though it was well written The book has a good reputation in the reading group, people assured me that I would be glad I had read it What could they mean Well written brutality could not be that attractive, could it Bragg experienced plenty of religion in his youth and his mother bought it a dollar at a time from the TV evangelists when they were destitute.Some of those TV preachers did good things with their millions, and some lied, cheated and stole, so it s unfair to lump them all into one pile But I wish those bad ones could have seen my momma with her hand on her thirty five dollar television, believing Maybe they would have done better Probably not It just makes me angry I am just mystified by this book Serious thing are buried behind a laugh she extracted three promises from us before we went out to play.One Don t kill yourself.Two Don t kill each other.Three Try hard not to kill nobody else, but if you have to, better if it ain t fam ly Life was sweet, often, and the crises were small.We were poor, but we were not dull Too many of the crises seemedthan small to my way of thinking I just don t have much of that kind of sense of humor, I guess Maybe this is the place someone else might think bittersweet.The NY Times reviewer wrote when the book was published in 1997 In a time when Bragg s family was at rock bottom, without food, a black boy from down the road brought them some corn his mother had sent over In the few contacts we had with them as children, we had thrown rocks at themI would like to say that we came together after the little boy brought us that food, that we learned about and from each other, but that would be a lie In the brutal realities faced by those like Bragg who were not white, not really, poor whites chose not to band together with blacks but to instead live in two separate, distinct states One would have liked to see evencommentary on this critical topic from so honest and thoughtful an observer.I can relate to that observation with the echo that this book is so much and yet still could have been so muchBragg brings us a real worldview from inside the life of white trash He escaped that world and I want so muchfrom his award winning pen.Bragg learned early that you didn t need to be black to be discriminated against The principal and teachers, when they recognized who we were, where we ranked, told Sam that he could sweep the narrow halls, clean the bathrooms and shovel coal into the school s furnace, to earn his free lunch He took out the trash and burned it and unclogged the toilet They never bothered to teach him to read very well he learned that on his own They never bothered to tell him about the world outside his narrow, limited one They forgot to show him maps of the universe or share the secrets of history, biology As other students behind the classroom doors read about empires, wars and kings, he waxed the gymnasium floor OK, so here I am forty percent of the way through the book and tired of reading about being white trash in the South Then, the scene changes and before I know it I am in Times Square New York City And then I am covering football and stock car racing And loving it But Bragg couldn t stay in college or remain a sportswriter He was just too good a writer and story teller.In the rest of the time in the book he alternates between telling about his family, a family that often had a problem with alcohol, and telling stories about being a journalist He tells stories about being in terrifying situations that are somehow told as adventuresome events Like the one about the alligators I dropped like a sack of mud straight down into the black water of the eighteen foot canal, and knew that I would surely die I rose up to grasp the side of the boat, scared to death, waiting for one of those twelve foot monsters to clamp down on my legs and drag me down I know that gators prefer a nice piece of rotted turtle to human beings I had read National Geographic, too I know they usually will not attack human beings if there is a poodle anywhere near, but none of that went through my head as I hung there, helpless It was only for a few minutes, but time has a different meaning when half your body is submerged in black water aswarm with alligators, the same gators your hunting partners had been jabbing with cold steel most of the night He tells story after story while smiling at danger with a completely straight face This is what makes him a great storyteller I thought for just a second that I might die there I am not trying to be melodramatic Reporters live for war stories, except the ones who have been so genuinely frightened in so many terrible places that they do not need to scare themselves all over again with their own memories But for just a second, on that sand road in the middle of the scrub, I knew I had risked my life for five or six paragraphs Rick Bragg parted ways with the NY Times in 2003 with a disagreement over his methodology of writing He took credit for an article that a freelancer had mostly written and then claimed that practice was common at the NY Times When he left the Times, he reportedly had a million dollar advance from a publisher for his next book So he wasn t poor any Now he writes for Southern Living magazine Here is a short video that will give you a glimpse of what the man has become In this video he says, Sweet tea might be a clich , but it s a delicious clich Occasionally Rick Bragg does manage to get serious with his writing, to drop the folksy, Southern storyteller persona But not often enough in this book as far as I am concerned He is way too busy being a good ole boy most of the time, spinning the tales Bragg considers himself to be a good talker I can imagine him being a standup comedian talking about growing up poor in the South He is a self made man.I spent a lot of time looking for the ring of authenticity in his writing but not finding it except maybe when he was talking about covering sports from the press box early in his career and having trouble getting the numbers and names right And his times in Haiti when he seemed to be a visitor to atrocities with a guide taking him to the stories and to the bodies for a price.I once worked closely with a man who talked by telling stories He would never answer a question directly but instead would tell a story You had to figure out what it meant I was not that I never knew what the point was to his stories I usually could figure it out But it did make it hard to pin him down sometimes when he was especially indirect Rick Bragg is like that for me He is often interesting to listen to but sometimes you just want him to get to the point To actually say something.One of the things that Bragg tells a lot of stories about is drunks His father was a serious drunk His younger brother is one He is an incipient alcoholic himself, I would say His Momma has tolerated drunks all her life she is good at it She expects it I am curious about what has become of his life since this book was published over fifteen years ago I have the next two books of the trilogy on my TBR shelf but my general disappointment with All Over but the Shoutinbumps them a little bit down on my list Bragg described himself as gothic, dark and personal and I would like to see him showof the man behind the screen

  8. Mister Jones says:

    I read this one awhile back, and I loved it I tend to like confessional autobiographies that don t shy away from flaws and shortcomings, and so I tend to be partial to works that are Bragg s book is all that and then some growing up poor in Alabama, small town with the those who have too much and those who have too little, and having to deal with it with the support of his mother It s tough writing, gritty, and in your face with no apologies and lots of personal pain GREAT yeah, I know thi I read this one awhile back, and I loved it I tend to like confessional autobiographies that don t shy away from flaws and shortcomings, and so I tend to be partial to works that are Bragg s book is all that and then some growing up poor in Alabama, small town with the those who have too much and those who have too little, and having to deal with it with the support of his mother It s tough writing, gritty, and in your face with no apologies and lots of personal pain GREAT yeah, I know this was a lame critique, but I didn t know where to begin with this one so overwhelming and so moving

  9. Gary says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here minimalist, naturalist, with indeterminate ending the ending doesn t sit right, but it s a fine essay A young man comes to see his dad for the last time, and they can only communicate through the inanimate objects and old stories, so they can t talk about their feelings Right, like the dad wanted to or the son could But the son, many years later, says he is still a prisoner of that last meeting I guess he should go outoften, butlikely, he was just trying for a good ending.

  10. Saleh MoonWalker says:

    Onvan All Over But the Shoutin Nevisande Rick Bragg ISBN 679774025 ISBN13 9780679774020 Dar 329 Safhe Saal e Chap 1997

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